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Winterize to Prevent Falls

Below are five simple steps that YOU can take today to make a big impact on falls for older adults and adults with disabilities in your community:

  1. Raise awareness by posting and disseminating this simple and colorful infographic -- 6 Steps to Prevent a Fall -- from the National Council on Aging.
  2. Check shoes, boots, and assistive devices and be sure that they are “winterized.”  
    1. Ingrid – Ice Gripper Cane Tip is available at Fashionable Canes and Cozy Winters  
    2. Yaktrax Spikeless Ice & Snow Shoe Gripper Sole Covers are at Fashionable Canes
    3. Keen shoes can be found at OnlineShoes
    4. Try this inexpensive way to make wheelchair snow tires
  3. Encourage older adults to carry a Ziploc bag filled with a lightweight kitty litter in their pocket and cast it out ahead of themselves on very slick surfaces. More information about using kitty litter for traction can be found here.
  4. ‘Tis the season for gift giving! Encourage adult children to give fall-proofing holiday gifts to their parents:
    1. Fall alarm systems that are motion triggered without hitting a button
    2. Higher toilets in the home
    3. Replace multifocal glasses with single vision eyeglass lenses
    4. Grab bars in bathroom and next to outside steps or inside thresholds

Continue reading fall prevention

"Get up and seize the day."

By Maclaen Burningham, Rural Institute Consumer Advisory Council Member

Emerging Leader Nate, from PolsonIn August 2014, I interviewed Nate of Polson, Montana, as an Emerging Leader. I have included the questions I asked Nate and his responses below. Because Nate doesn't speak, I sent him the questions ahead of time and his family communicated with him to develop his answers. His dad spoke for him in the interview, with occasional nods of the head in agreement by Nate to what his dad said.  

Maclaen:  Thank you for agreeing to this interview.  I am going to ask you some questions.  Please answer them as thoroughly as you can.  You don't have to answer any questions you don't want to answer.  We want to help other young adults and their families understand how you are able to live, work, play and learn in your community.  Where do you live?  

Nate:  I live in an apartment that used to be part of a duplex. My parents live upstairs. This gives me the potential in the future to gain more independence by learning to take care of myself.

Maclaen: Where do you work or volunteer?

Nate:  Although currently I do not have paid employment, I volunteer at the local food bank with my dad. We re-package potatoes, recycle cardboard and pick up donations from a local grocery store. I enjoy the work as well as time with the staff.

Continue reading the interview with Nate...

 

Donate Used Medical Equipment

MonTECH-donate-equipment-flyer

Please share this during our season of giving and remembering others.

Mon-Fri 9 AM—4 PM
MonTECH/ UM’s Rural Institute
700 SW Higgins, Suite 200, Missoula, MT 59803
montech.ruralinsititue.umt.edu

Call 406- 243-2841 or 243-5511

Please don't throw away good and lightly used medical equipment. Pass it on to another Montana resident in need.

All kinds of medical equipment accepted.
Adaptive equipment for children with disabilities is always in need. Plus, sometime or other, we all need crutches, canes, walkers, wheelchairs,  commodes, tub benches etc. When you no longer need the equipment or device, consider donating it for another Montanan to use.

Benefiting all Montanans experiencing temporary or permanent disability.

 

Rural Institute for Inclusive Communties presents at DiverseU

Meg 2014 DiverseUFaculty and staff of UM’s Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities presented information on community accessibility at “DiverseU,” the University of Montana’s annual diversity symposium. Presentations offered insight into the ways in which community design either includes or excludes people with disabilities and began with an historic overview.

Bob Listen at DiverseUThe history of disability has been one of exclusion in which people with disabilities were not able to be part of daily life and were often institutionalized in inhumane conditions. But in the 1960’s, advocates and activists worked for sweeping social change that eventually led to the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Although the ADA is coming up on its 25th anniversary, many community spaces remain inaccessible.

Continue reading more about the DiverseU presentation

"Visit Montana Colleagues" trip report by Marty Blair

Scenery from Marty's Visit Montana's Colleagues trip

trip-odometer-with-miles
1250.1. That is the number of miles I traveled last week on my "Visit Montana Colleagues" trip.

I started in Helena with the new Developmental Disabilities Program (DDP) director, the MT Part C Coordinator, and the director of Disability and Employment Transitions (MT's VR agency). I spent almost two hours with our federal partner, the MT Developmental Disabilities Council.

In Billings I met with the medical and administration staff at The Children's Clinic, I also met with the director of PLUK, Inc and the director of Early Childhood Intervention (ECI).

On to Glendive where I spent several hours with the Prairie View Special Services Coop coordinator (provides special education and related services in 13 eastern counties) and the new president of Dawson Community College.

Continue reading about Marty's trip

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