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New article by Mindy Renfro in the Rural Connections Spring 2016 publication

Happy senior coupleHope for the Best and Plan for the Worst
Can You Age-in-Place in YOUR Home?

The Western Rural states are aging. It is expected that by 2025,  Montana’s population will be the fourth oldest state in the union. It’s also estimated that by 2030, Montana will be one of ten states in the country to have more people over the age of 65 than under the age of 18, and it will be one of only six states to have 25 percent of its population aged 65 and older.

Policy makers are reshaping Medicare; politicians are trying to protect Social Security... but what are each of us doing to be sure that we can age-in-place in our own homes? Each day, 10,000 Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) are celebrating their 65th birthday and joining the ranks of “older adults.”

RuralConnections - A publication of the Western Rural Development Center, Spring 2016

MonTECH Welcomes a New Director

anna margaret goldman2Dr. Anna-Margaret Goldman recently completed her PhD in Higher Education Administration at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. However, she is no stranger to Montana. She has lived in Missoula part time since 2009. Her most recent position was Prevention Specialist at C.S. Porter Middle School. Prior to that she was responsible for growing a university mentoring program at the University of Alabama. She brings excellent skills in developing campus/community relationships.

We are delighted to have her as a member of the Rural Institute’s Leadership Team and as a community-focused colleague. Please join us in welcoming Anna-Margaret to the Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities.

Helen Russette on the value of visitable homes

How visitable homes benefit you and your community

Helen Russette for the Missoulian, May 5, 2016

"A home is foundational to our well-being. For most, our home provides us with a sense of security, safety, and a place where we most often spend time with our loved ones. To me, this means having a roof over my head, safe running water, protection from weather extremities, and creating memories with my family and friends. We all define and describe what home means to us in different ways, but we share the common understanding that home is at the core of our daily lives. Purchasing or renting a home tends to be the single greatest expenditure Americans make. Our home can also play a role in shaping our health and well-being.

However, as we and our loved ones continue to live longer than our parents and grandparents before us, we can also expect to experience disability, such as mobility limitations that require assistive equipment like a wheelchair, walker, or cane. When homes include steps to the main entrance, have no bathroom on the first floor, and the door widths are too narrow to accommodate a wheelchair, our home, our very core, is disrupted and negative consequences can occur."

Continue reading visitable homes on the Missoulian.

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