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Living and Working Well: Health Promotion for People with Mobility Impairments

Upcoming RHI Webinar!

Tuesday, September 9, 2014
10:00 to 11:00 A.M. MTN
Register at: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/396049714

Join us to learn about two community-based programs that support the health, quality of life, and participation of people living with disabilities in Montana.

Access to healthcare is both a common rural healthcare problem and a specific problem for people with disabilities. When these two challenges are combined, the individual with a disability who lives in a rural area confronts additional barriers to receiving the quality of care that support health, quality of life, and participation in rural communities.

These two evidence-based programs provide alternative models for delivering health promotion services to people with disabilities in rural areas by using existing resources, building community capacity, and encouraging full use of local services to ensure people with disabilities have opportunity to healthy living in Montana.

Topics will include:  the behavioral risks and health status of people with disabilities, secondary conditions, health promotion for people with disabilities, community partnerships, capacity building.

Continue reading about Webinar

Early Exposure to People with Physical and Sensory Disabilities and Later Attitudes Toward Social Interactions and Inclusion

Emily M. Lund, Tom Seekins

Abstract

This study assessed the relationship between exposure to classmates with visible impairments in primary and secondary schools with later attitudes toward people with disabilities.  Fifty college students (mean age = 20.28 years; 76% female) completed measures assessing the extent and quality of recalled exposure to classmates with disabilities in elementary and secondary school. Attitudes toward social inclusion and toward a hypothetical social interaction were also measured. Participants reported generally high levels and quality of exposure, with significantly more exposure at the secondary level. Quality of exposure at both the elementary and secondary levels was significantly (p < .01) correlated with more positive cognitions (i.e., thoughts) during a hypothetical social interaction. Cognitions were not significantly correlated with emotions or behaviors and amount of elementary exposure was negatively correlated with attitudes to social inclusion (p < .05). These results suggest a possible relation between positive early experiences and later friendship intentions that should be further explored.

Continue reading at: http://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/pders/article/view/4825

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If you would like to make a tax deductible contribution to this program or have questions about how you can make a positive difference at the Rural Institute, please contact Martin Blair, the Rural Institute Executive Director. 

Major Programs within the Rural Institute

 

  • montech
  • rtc
  • childcareplus
  • Montana Disability Health
  • transistion-employment
  • DBLogoNEW2
  • TTEAM
  • Living Well with a Disability
  • Working Well with a Disability
  • Telecom Toolbox
  • HPE - Health Plans for Employment